М. М. Ахрамович, С. С. Дроздова, О. В. Евдокимова, Л. М. Ушакова


Answer the questions. Write the best letter in the boxes. You can use a letter more than once



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2. Answer the questions. Write the best letter in the boxes. You can use a letter more than once.

1

2

3

4

5

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1. Which shop sells raincoats?

2. Where can you buy pills?

3. From which shop is it possible to buy things from home?

4. Which shop is open on Sunday, too?

5. Which shop sells and buys things, too?

6. Where can you buy shampoo?

7. Which shop sells something to eat?

CLOTHES

1. Read the text.

Clothing is a distinctly human artifact. Even more than the use of tools, it distinguishes humans from the other creatures on this planet. While there are other creatures which use implements to a greater or lesser degree, clothing is unique to humanity. Clothing is also uniquely human, in that it serves more than one function. The basic purpose of clothing was originally utilitarian. By putting on an artificial skin, humans were able to move into regions where they otherwise would have been unable to cope with the climate. An extreme example of this use of clothing can be seen among the Eskimos, and other people who live with extreme cold. However, clothing was not only used for protection from the elements, but has also been a means of displaying one's status and sense of style for as long as humans have had civilisation. Thus clothing also developed in countries where there is no real practical need for it, apart from the other, very human function of preserving the modesty of the wearer.

Clothing tells us many things about the wearer. It can be used to indicate whether she is a member of a particular group or organisation, the most extreme example of this type of clothing being a uniform. It tells us a lot about the importance of clothing that the clothes a person was wearing have been, literally, the difference between life and death. In war, soldiers recognise friends and enemies by their uniforms. Spies may be shot if captured, but if they go about their business in the uniform of their country, they are regarded as legitimate members of that country's armed forces.

Uniforms can also be less formal. Anyone who has seen a group of teenagers walking together will have noticed that their clothing conforms to the standard set by their particular group. Nor are teens the only ones who are subject to such pressures. It is a rare businessman who does not feel the need to wear a suit and tie. Most politicians also try to be neat and well-dressed. People who wish to impress others often do so by the selection of their clothes – sometimes by choosing more expensive versions. This can be seen particularly in the fashion industry, where clothing by a particular designer fetches prices which are out of all proportion to the actual utilitarian value of the material.

The significance of what we wear and how we wear it is, if anything, becoming more rather than less important as the cultures of the world mix and sometimes come into collision. There have been cases on holiday islands where the locals have a strict conservative tradition and have been outraged by visitors – especially female visitors – who wear far less than the minimum that the locals consider decent. The humble headscarf has become a symbol of conformism to religious values, and some westerners are as affronted by a woman wearing one as others in the middle east are upset by its absence. (Yet in medieval Europe, both men and women habitually kept their heads covered in public, and almost always when outdoors.) Indeed, the signals given by clothing as worn by men and women has not decreased because many women now wear what were once "men's" garments. For example today most women are very comfortable wearing jeans. Yet the sight of a man in a dress would raise eyebrows in most western cultures. For even though the signals given by clothing change over time – the ancient Romans thought that only barbarians wore trousers – the signals themselves are as strong as ever. It is impossible not to signal something about yourself in the clothes you wear, for even not trying to say anything is itself a strong signal.

Therefore, even though we are steadily managing to adjust our micro-environments to temperatures which are as close to ideal as the human body wants, and even though sexual taboos of undress are being steadily eroded, it is highly unlikely there will be no use for clothing in our future, unless humanity evolves into a completely new species.


2. Choose the correct answer.

1. Clothes are uniquely human because they

a. are artifacts.

b. have many different functions.

c. are made by tools.

d. are worn when they are unnecessary.

2. The author thinks that

a. clothing is an implement.

b. there is no real need for clothing in some countries.

c. clothes are principally for protection from the weather.

d. people will always wear clothes.

3. Which of the following does the author NOT give as a function of clothing?

a. To show how wealthy or powerful the wearer is.

b. To show the wearer's taste.

c. To adjust our micro-environment.

d. To avoid indecency.

4. According to the article, uniforms

a. are mainly worn by soldiers.

b. have many functions.

c. show membership of a group.

d. are always worn by teenagers.

5. The author suggests that fashion in clothing

a. is ridiculous.

b. is a part of its social function.

c. is used to show membership of a group.

d. makes clothes too expensive.

6. Teenagers wear very similar clothing to their friends

a. because they have the same climate.

b. to avoid looking different from the others.

c. because of sexual taboos of undress.

d. to display their status and style.
7. In future clothing will ...

a. be worn by other species.

b. be less needed for its original function.

c. be steadily eroded.

d. become ideal for the needs of the human body.

8. What might be a suitable title for the article?

a. The function of clothing.

b. Clothing as fashion.

c. The future of clothes

d. The story of clothes.

WHERE DID YOU GET THAT DRESS?
As a young child Gwen Crowley would often borrow her older sister’s clothes and dress up as a princess or an actress. Gwen, 38, still likes to put on other people’s clothes, only now the blouses and dresses she wears belong to famous film stars. She also buys clothes from celebrities such as Cher in order to sell them in her second-hand clothes shop, Star Wares, in Los Angeles.
1. Read a magazine article about a woman who buys clothes from famous people and then sells them in her shop. Eight sentences have been removed from the article.

Cher tends to get rid of a lot of things each year and we just go over with a truck and pick them up. I’ve met her a few times, although I’ve never been wearing any of her clothes at the time. 1. __________________________________________.

I love Cher’s style. I have her shoes, her jewellery and even some of her furniture. They’re a real bargain because I pay less for them than she did originally. Many of my customers don’t wear the clothes they buy and just keep them as memorabilia.

2. __________________________________________________________________.

I also had a denim shirt which I bought from Mel Gibson. I wore it all the time, even when I was decorating the house. 3. ___________________________

I really liked that shirt and it was great fun telling people which famous person owned it before.

My first ever purchase was a white T-shirt of Cher’s that had peace signs all over it and which I wore until it fell to pieces. But my favourite item of clothing at the moment is a black shirt of hers by Ghost. I’m a little bigger than her, so her clothes are often quite tight on me. 4. ________________________________________________.

It’s a plain, flowing shirt that feels really nice to wear – except when it’s raining.

5. _______________________________________________________.

The shirt shrank and the sleeves, which were long, suddenly went up past my elbow. I was really upset. I had to go into the bathroom and put it under the dryer. Luckily it survived. Now I wear it just about everywhere – around the house, out shopping, at work.

Sometimes I see Cher in magazines and think, I’d like that top or dress, and a few months later it comes into the shop. If she’s worn the item on a CD cover or something, I don’t usually buy it because then it becomes a collector’s item and can be very expensive. 6. _______________________________________________.

Although my husband doesn’t share my passion, he was delighted when I bought him Cary Grant’s silver cigarette case for his 40th birthday. 7. ___________________.

It’s a real talking point at parties because my husband is called Lou and everybody asks: “Why does it say Cary?” When he tells them, they’re amazed.

It’s wonderful to have a part of someone that you admire, that you can actually hold, look at, enjoy and wear. At the moment I’ve got my eye on a very special costume from my all time favourite TV programme. 8. _________________________.

It’s not the sort of thing you can wear to the shops, but it would certainly attract attention at a fancy dress party!
2. Choose from the sentences A – I the one which fits each gap (1 – 8). There is one extra sentence you do not need to use.

A. If it was something I really liked, though, I would buy it, no matter how much it cost.

B. I got paint on it and all sorts of other stains, but it broke my heart when I finally had to throw it away.

C. It’s in a cloth bag and has the actor’s name inscribed on the front.

D. However, I like to enjoy my clothes and I always wear Cher’s things until they’re worn out.

E. It’s Dr McCoy’s original tunic from the Star Trek series.

F. I once wore it to a TV interview and got caught in a storm.

G. They don’t go with any of my other clothes but they still look good on me!

H. This one, though, is a lot looser and fits me perfectly.

I. I’m not sure how she’d react if she saw me in one of her old sweaters or skirts.


Level B 2

BRANDING
1. Read the extracts from a text about branding.

A

Having a good brand identity is critical. It can not only position a company above its competitors, but it also communicates to your customers the reason why they should choose you instead of your competitors. But developing a strong brand image takes time, money and effort, and it involves much more than redesigning a logo or developing a new tagline. Your new brand identity should evolve from your previous identity. Be careful not to start from scratch and come up with something completely new, as you may end up losing loyal customers who have forged emotion ties with your product.



B

It’s important to understand that changing the visual aspects of your company, your logo, your packaging and so forth, you are not actually changing your brand identity. Your brand identity is the promise a company makes to its customers – its features, quality, values and service support. Just modernising visual image does not entail a change in brand values. Many companies, sadly, are led to believe by branding agencies that visual changes will alter customer’s perception of their products. But such changes only inform consumers that a company is concerned about how it looks. At best, they will assume the company is modern; at worst they will accuse the company of unnecessary extravagance.



C

Successful branding may not be actually connected with the product at all, but may represent a greater sense of purpose or a more satisfying experience. They may affirm that drinking a cup of coffee can really make a difference, or that exercising may bring about a sense of challenge and personal achievement. Many successful brands study emerging societal ideals and trends, so that they can take advantage of how customers wish they could be. Then they push forward the message that by using their product, their dreams can be fulfilled, and the customer can gain the lifestyle he or she is looking for, be it a sense of glamour, freedom, popularity or self-satisfaction.



D

Lack of consistency is probably the most common pitfall when it comes to designing an image for your brand. You need to provide a consistent message in your proposals and presentations so that your company develops credibility and gets noticed and remembered. To ensure that your branding ins consistent, gather all the information that leaves your company, be it faxes, emails, advertisements, invoices or packages. Examine them for discrepancies in your company’s image. Doing so will also give you the chance to evaluate the image you are trying portray.


2. Choose which section (A, B, C or D) each statement (1 – 7) refers to.

1. a list of some items which should display your brand identity

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency.



2. the difference between brand identity and logo design

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency



3. brands which do not reflect the product itself

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency



4. how companies are fooled by companies offering branding services

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency



5. what is involved in creating an image for your brand

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency



6. why companies study current social trends to develop a brand

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency



7. a warning about redesigning your brand

a. Having a good brand.

b. It’s important.

c. Successful branding.

d. Lack of consistency





COOKIE SALE

        1. Read the text.

The idea that a sales team can learn something from Girl Scouts will come as a surprise to many. What has this out-dated organisation got to do with the fast-moving, corporate world of today? But in the girl scouts’ annual cookie drive, two hundred million units are sold per year, and their revenues exceed $700 million. And these figures are achieved only in a three-month period in the spring.

True, the organization has changed greatly in latter years, ever since the appointment of CEO Kathy Cloninger in 2003. Her mission was to revitalize a 95-year tradition-bound icon, famous only for camping, crafts and cookies. She has worked on instilling leadership qualities in the girls, developing new funding opportunities, creating an efficient organisational structure and developing a reinvigorated brand which is relevant to the modern world.

And nowhere are these changes more noticeable than in the annual cookie sale. No longer relying on neighbourhood door-to-door sales to obtain a meagre revenue, the organisation now utilises a wide range of savvy, modern methods which businesses worldwide can learn from.

Firstly, the girl scouts organization focuses on providing the girls with life skills. By investing in the girls, the organization creates a team with strong leadership and communication skills. ‘Cookie College’ training courses develop the scouts’ business acumen, providing them with presentation, marketing and money management skills; skills which will be invaluable in their future lives. Through role-playing, case studies and tasks, the girls become inspired and passionate about their role as a salesperson.

And the proof of the pudding – or should I say cookie – is in the eating. These well-trained salesgirls can turn out exceptional results. Scout Markita Andrews sold over $80,000 dollars worth of cookies in the twelve years she was a girl scout. Her success is for the most part due to the incentive. By selling the greatest number of cookies, Markita won a trip around the world. Rewards are not only given to the lucky winners, however. Scouts earn reward points as they sell more cookies. 1,500 cookies gets the scout a Wii game system.

But Girl scouts are not only training and motivating their workforce, but they are also changing their tactics. Gone are the days when girls went door-to-door around the neighbourhood selling to family and friends. They now go in for the bulk sales strategy. They sell to large organisations and businesses, where cookies can be offered as sales incentives or part of corporate gift baskets. This way, girls are able to shift a greater number of cookies and maximise their sales time.
2. Choose the correct answer.

1. When do the Girl Scouts sell cookies?

a. All year round.

b. For three months per year.

c. Every three years.

d. Every spring since 2003.

2. What was the view of the girls scout organisation before Kathy Cloninger became CEO?

a. Not well-known.

b. Old-fashioned.

c. Efficient.

d. Surprising.

3. Which of the following is not taught at ‘Cookie College’?

a. How to look after finances.

b. How to promote your products.

c. How to bake cookies.

d. How to speak in front of other people.

4. A girl scout can get a trip round the world if she

a. gets a certain number of reward points.

b. sells cookies for twelve years in a row.

c. sells $80,000 worth of cookies.

d. sells more cookies than anyone else.

5. A new selling strategy used by girl scouts is

a. selling cookies outside local businesses.

b. giving scouts free cookies as an incentive.

c. selling from door to door.

d. selling large amounts of cookies at once.

6. Which of the following sales techniques is NOT mentioned in the passage?

a. Motivating the sales team.

b. Finding new avenues for sales.

c. Offering discounts for bulk orders.

d. Training the sales team.

ROLL-PLAY? NO – THE WORKING REALITY OF A SANDWICH BAR
1. Read the text. Six paragraphs have been removed from the article.

Sonya and I wanted to start a business of our own, rather than work in a big company environment. We considered a number of different businesses but felt there was a gap on many High Streets for a quality sandwich shop – an alternative to the standard fast food choice of McDonald’s or Burger King.

We did quite a lot of research, such as questionnaires and pedestrian counts, building up as much information as we could. We weren’t fixed in terms of where we wanted to set up, as the ideal location was all-important, so we visited Leeds, Bristol, and Portsmouth as well as Southampton.

1. _________________________________________________________.

We had just a few thousand pounds between us so it was a matter of approaching the banks. The Midland Bank agreed to lend us £30,000 under the Small Firms Loan Guarantee Scheme, where part of the loan is guaranteed by the government. We also secured £5,000 from a business trust.



2. _______________________________________________.

We had fixed ideas about what we wanted to sell. The baguettes had to be just right: not too thin and not too big. We decided right from the start that our French bread would indeed be French and we’d get it from a distributor and part-bake it. We were ready to open in December 1995, well into the Christmas season and typically a very good month for business. We opened right from the start with four staff.



3. ________________________________________________________.

Gradually the business pulled round and we got into a routine with our systems, which are vital for any fast-food operation. There tend to be some very busy periods during the day. You certainly don’t want queues. And you need staff who work well together.



4. _____________________________________________________.

We offer a variety of breads from sun-dried tomato to white farmhouse and if you take into account our salad toppings as well as fillings we offer 44 million combinations of sandwich.



5. ______________________________________________________.

The daily routine involves staff coming in at 7.30 a.m. to start doing the preparation. The more work that can be done in advance, the more time you can save when the shop gets full of people. And then by 8 a.m. we are open for the breakfast trade.



6. ___________________________________________________________.

We close at 6 p.m. (7 p.m. on Thursday) but some nights we have to work late. Sonya and I are now working on opening a new shop in Southampton, and also further expansion.



I think where we’ve succeeded is that we’ve never compromised on what we offer. We are a sandwich bar and have never ventured into selling jacket potatoes or chips. It’s our intention to open other outlets and possibly franchise the concept and become a national operation. We have the energy, and time, on our side.
2. Choose which of the paragraphs A – G fit into the gaps. There is one extra paragraph which does not fit in any of the gaps.

A. Once we had the money organized we had to find a place. The site we chose was a former clothes shop which made it ideal because it already had the right kind of floor and lightning. The lease was typical of properties in the area at between £30,000 and £35,000 and we had to put in an oven, counter, upstairs preparation area, tills, fridges and freezers, making our start-up costs around £50,000.

B. The first day, however, was a real trial. We took £200, less than even half of what we need to break even, and we had the prospect of the less busy January and February season approaching.

C. The busy time is obviously the lunchtime but that can extend to 3.30 p.m. Our business continues longer than many sandwich bars where that lunch-hour trade is the be-all and end-all.

D. Our families were incredibly supportive and helpful. My father, a carpenter by trade, helped out with the shop fitting, while Sonya’s aunt was a fund of useful ideas for sandwich fillings and types of bread. She was so enthusiastic she wanted to help out in the shop but we felt that at 86 she was better off at home.

E. Other preparations that we felt were important included trying to gain some practical experience. Sonya had worked in a small Gloucestershire café and I had spent two months in McDonald’s.

F. Getting the right people was very important and we rejected about nine out of ten people. It is important to build an efficient team who can work together in a friendly way, and deal politely and efficiently with the public.

G. However, people are generally still conservative in this market. Our biggest sellers are chicken, cheese, ham and tuna. More exotic fillings such as marinaded red pepper and goat cheese have fewer takers. Four or five types of bread are very popular.

UNIT 7 ENVIRONMENT

Level A 2
POSTCARDS FROM THE NORDIC COUNTRIES
1. Last summer Jim, Tim and Nina went for a holiday in the Nordic countries. Read the postcards they sent to their families and try to guess where they have been.


Hallo.

We are in a very exciting country. We have been on a ride on some nice horses. The horses were quite small, but they were not ponies. We have seen glaciers and a geyser. Tomorrow we will go for a bath in a spa located in a lava field.

We are in 1. _______________

Love Jim, Tim and Nina.


a. Denmark.

b. Finland.

c. Iceland.

d. Norway.

e. Sweden.






Hallo again.

We have travelled by airplane and have arrived in a nice country that is a big contrast to where we came from. Here are no mountains or glaciers, but fields and nice beaches. It is quite windy here, and we can see modern windmills in many places. Tomorrow we plan to visit Tivoli for some fun after we have seen the little Mermaid.

We are in 2. _______________

Love Jim, Tim and Nina.



a. Denmark.

b. Finland.

c. Iceland.

d. Norway.

e. Sweden.




Hallo once more.

This is the most fantastic holiday. Today we have walked on a glacier. It was really great, but a bit hard. Yesterday we were on a boat trip on the deep fjord, but it was too cold for swimming. We visited a copy of a Viking village where some people had dressed up as Vikings. They even had a small Viking ship. We are in 3. _______________

Love Jim, Tim and Nina.


a. Denmark.

b. Finland.

c. Iceland.

d. Norway.

e. Sweden.





Hallo.

The wind sighs through the birches in the land of Emil and Pippi. We visited their “hometown” where we met several of their friends, like Karlsson-on-the-Roof and Ronia the Robber's Daughter. They are not real of course, but characters from children literature.

We are in 4. _______________

Love Jim, Tim and Nina.


a. Denmark.

b. Finland.

c. Iceland.

d. Norway.

e. Sweden.







Hallo.

Our holiday comes to an end soon, but we have one more country to visit, the home of the Moomins and Nokia phones. This is the country of thousands of lakes and islands, and large forests. In the capital we saw the Sibelius monument. It looked like a funny organ.

We are in 5. _______________

Love Jim, Tim and Nina.


a. Denmark.

b. Finland.

c. Iceland.

d. Norway.

e. Sweden.





2. Read the postcards once again and match each postcard with the country mentioned above.

A. B.

This postcard is from … This postcard is from …

C. D.

This postcard is from … This postcard is from …
E.

This postcard is from …

THE SAVANNAH

1. Read the text.
The tourist looking at the African savannah on a summer afternoon might be excused for thinking that the wide yellow grass plain was completely deserted of life, almost a desert. With only a few small thorn trees sticking out through the veldt, there seems to be almost no place for a living creature to hide.

However, under those trees you might find small steenbok, sleeping in the shade, and waiting for the night to fall. There may even be a small group of lions somewhere, their bodies exactly the same shade as the tall grass around them. In the holes in the ground a host of tiny creatures, from rabbits and badgers to rats and snakes are waiting for the heat to finish.

The tall grass also hides the fact that there may be a small stream running across the middle of the plain. One clue that there may be water here is the sight of a majestic Marshall eagle circling slowly over the grassland. When he drops, he may come up with a small fish, or maybe a grass snake that has been waiting at the edge of a pool in the hope of catching a frog.

The best time to see the animals then, is in the evening, just as the sun is setting. The best time of the year to come is in late September, or early August, just before the rains. Then the animals must come to the waterholes, as there is no other place for them to drink. And they like to come while it is still light, so they can see if any dangers are creeping up on them.

So it is at sunset, and after the night falls, that the creatures of the African veldt rise and go about their business.
2. Choose the correct answer.

1. This text is for people interested in

a. eagles.

b. wildlife.

c. travel.

d. biology.

2. The savannah appears to be empty because

a. the animals are sleeping.

b. the animals have gone about their business.

c. they have been frightened by an eagle.

d. the temperature prevents much activity.

3. The writer suggests that

a. the savannah is a desert.

b. the Marshall eagle eats fish.

c. it has not rained for a long time.

d. tourists should not come in dry weather.

4. By "go about their business" the writer means

a. tourism in Africa is big business.

b. the animals go to the river to drink.

c. the animals go on with their normal activity.

d. the animals are observed by naturalists.

5. What kind of book does the text seem to be from?

a. A book for experts on wildlife.

b. A fictional story.

c. A history of Africa.

d. General non-fiction.

TWO GIANT PANDAS ARRIVE IN SCOTLAND



1. Read this news article about the UK’s newest guests. Five sentences have been removed from the article.
Tian Tian and Yang Guang arrived at Edinburgh Airport at 1pm on a specially-chartered non-stop flight from China. The eight-year-old breeding pair are destined for Edinburgh Zoo, which will be their new home for the next 10 years.

1.___________________________________________. "I am delighted to confirm that the FedEx Panda Express has safely touched down at Edinburgh International Airport," said Captain Paul Cassell.

2.________________________________________________________________. Although every flight is unique, this flight has been particularly special – carrying such rare animals made the journey very exciting for all of us."

They will now have two weeks to settle into their new enclosure before going on display to the public.



3.___________________________________________________________________. The Scottish Government and tourism officials hope the animals' presence will boost the economy and visitor numbers to the country.

4. _____________________________________________________________. First Minister Alex Salmond is in China at the moment.

Online footage of the two animals, from four hidden "panda-cams" in their enclosures, is expected to attract viewers from around the world.



5. ________________________________________________________. The rest of the plant is to be imported from Amsterdam in the Netherlands.
2. Choose from the sentences A – G the one which fits each gap (1 –5). There is one extra sentence you do not need to use.

A. It is hoped that the pandas, the first to live in the UK for 17 years, will eventually give birth to cubs.

B. Four pilots with "extensive experience" in transporting some of the world's most precious cargo, including white rhinos and penguins, were also on the flight.

C. Edinburgh Zoo is to grow about 15% of the bamboo needed to feed the giant pandas.

D. Tian Tian and Yang Guang – the names translate as Sweetie and Sunshine – are the first giant pandas to live in the UK for 17 years, in what is seen as a reinstatement of "panda diplomacy".

E. Edinburgh Zoo is to grow about 15% of the bamboo needed to feed the giant pandas.

F. It was an absolute privilege and honor to fly Tian Tian and Yang Guang, and to be part of this significant moment to bring the pandas to their new home in the UK.

G. Scottish ministers also said the loan of the pandas symbolises a "growing friendship" between Scotland and China.

Level B 1
LET’S MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE
1. Read a magazine article about various local campaigns.
A. Homes For All

Organisations that help the homeless are warning that people will face even greater hardship this winter unless urgent action is taken to offer shelter to those without a home. This warning follows publication of figures showing an increase in the number of homeless people. Susan Evans of the organisation 'Homes for All' said: "With a shortage of accommodation, more people than ever before – young and old – are having to sleep rough. A cold winter is predicted this year which means that these people will have to put up with sub-zero temperatures. Action must be taken urgently to offer these people shelter." A nationwide demonstration to raise awareness of the problem will take place this weekend. Supporters welcome.






B. Village Protest

Residents of local village, Shilden, are preparing for a night of protest to save their village from Government planners. Proposals for a new motorway to be built that will run within 2 kilometres of Shilden have caused uproar amongst residents. They claim that they were given insufficient time to respond to the proposal. Tony Fellows, spokesperson for the 'Village Protest' campaign explains: "The planned route cuts across some of the most picturesque countryside in the region. Shilden welcomes thousands of tourists each year. Many of the shopkeepers depend on this trade and would almost certainly face ruin if tourists were put off coming by the damage this road is likely to cause". The all-night protest will take place in the fields where the building work is likely to begin.


C. New Youth Club

Youngsters in the city-centre will lose out on a much-loved project if substantial funds are not found this year. The 'New Youth Club', which is open to young people from the ages of 10 to 17, is being threatened with closure by Health and Safety officials who claim the building is unsafe. The club, built 30 years ago, was badly damaged by heavy storms last year and city engineers estimate that one hundred thousand pounds is needed to repair structural damage. With only limited funds at their disposal, managers fear the club will have to close. Youngsters from the club have organised an Open Day on Tuesday in an effort to raise some of the money needed to enable the repairs to be undertaken. "This alone won't be enough, however" warned Adam Ross, Youth Leader.






D. Save Lea Valley

A rare species of butterfly and many native plants face extinction if the 'Lea Valley office complex' project goes ahead. This is the claim made by local environmentalists involved in the 'Save Lea Valley' campaign. They argue that the proposed development, to be built on the site of woodland dating back hundreds of years, will rob the country of several rare species of wildlife. 'Local people would be horrified if they knew of the consequences of this project,' claimed environmentalist Ian Wilson yesterday. "We need to instigate a local campaign to alert everyone to the dangers. We are starting by writing letters to everyone in the area asking for their support. The office complex developers must not be allowed to do this."


2. Choose which section (A, B, C or D) each statement (1 – 15) refers to.

1. Local businesses could be badly affected.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



2. People in the area are not aware of the problem.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



3. There are plans to build a brand new building.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



4. The campaign supporters do not have to meet together.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



5. The problem affects all age groups.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



6. The problem was caused by bad weather.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



7. If the plan goes ahead it will spoil the look of the area.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



8. The campaign cannot raise enough money on its own.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



9. The problem was announced shortly after a report was published.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.




10. Young people are in danger.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



11. Local people are very angry.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



12. A meeting will inform people of the problem.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



13. People did not have the opportunity to argue against the plan.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



14. A demonstration is planned across the country.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



15. A fundraising event has been planned.

a. A. Homes For All.

b. B. Village Protest.

c. C. New Youth Club.

d. D. Save Lea Valley.



Каталог: bitstream -> edoc
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